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In 62 Episodes until Death
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New releases
Christian Marazzi: Le socialisme du capital
Inke Arns (ed.), Sylvia Sasse (ed.), ...: Nikolaj Evreinov: »The Storming of the Winter Palace«
Frédéric Morlot, Anne-Margot Ramstein: Albert Einstein's Bright Ideas
Claus Pias: Computer Game Worlds
Gertrud Koch: Breaking Bad, Breaking Out, Breaking Even
Kerstin Stakemeier (ed.), Susanne Witzgall (ed.): The Present of the Future
Fragility is the only thing I really know about me
Fragility is the only thing I really know about me

Claire Denis

“Fragility is the only thing I really know about me”

I am not a very balanced person. I am fragile and sad – almost as described in Triste Tropiques by Claude Lévi-Strauss. I feel both those adjectives, I grew up with them. I was aware of my fragility even when I was very young – a baby, learning to walk, living somewhere in Africa and already feeling that the number of white persons was very small compared to the number of black persons and also noticing that most of the... ABO
  • subjectivity
  • identity
  • film d'auteur
  • autofiction
Arts

For an aesthetic mode of thought beyond the “linguistic turn”

To begin our journey, we must first examine the question of art as beauty and of aesthetics as a branch of philosophy—not simply as a theory of perception, but first and foremost as a science of the ‘beautiful’ and the ‘sublime’. In the early modern period, whenever the arts are mentioned, they are almost always referred to as the ‘fine’ or beautiful arts. As is well-known, aesthetics has two beginnings; in the eighteenth century and in the nineteenth century. Alexander Baumgarten first defined aesthetics as a scientia sensitiva or science of perception. In German Idealism, Georg ­Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph Schelling, and Friedrich Hölderlin revisited aesthetics, ­defining it as a theory of art. The relationship between the two is not immediately clear. The former was grounded mostly in aisthēsis, a form of cognition classified as belonging to the physical abilities of sensations, and was situated in the lower...

  • aesthetics
  • artistic research
  • Think Art
  • discourse analysis
  • epistemology
Arts

The endless array of merchandise

In contemporary capitalism, subjectivity is the product of a mass industry organized on a global level. For Félix Guattari this is actually the first and most important of capitalist productions, because it preconditions and is part of production in all other forms of merchandise. Subjectivity is a ‘key merchandise,’ which in its ‘nature’ is put together, developed and manufactured in the same way as a car, electricity, or a washing machine. Capitalism organizes the production and control of subjectivity through two different systems, which weave together the manufacture of the individuated subject (“social subjection”) and what seems to be the opposite, de-subjectification (“machinic enslavement”). Therefore capitalism exercises a twofold hold over subjectivity.

Social subjection involves techniques of government, which pass by way of, and mobilize, representation (political and linguistic), areas of knowledge, discursive visual practices, etc., and produce ‘subjects of rights,’ ‘political subjects,’ in short: ‘subjects’ of ‘I’s,’ of individuals. By...

  • Governmentality
  • identity
  • algorithms
  • capitalism
  • data
A fast trip through the American night
A fast trip through the American night

Mike Wilson

Rockabilly

Rockabilly began digging late one spring night with a rusty shovel in his backyard.
 Everything had begun a few hours earlier. It was getting late, the lights in the neighborhood were starting to come on, and the red stain on the horizon was growing faint. In some houses TVs flickered. In others, families gathered around the dinner table. But Rockabilly had no family, no TV. He was in the living room, under a weak light bulb, kneeling on a pile of... ABO
Fiction

Des Caughnawagas

Les plus lestes des Indiens d’Amérique du Nord appartiennent à une bande de sang-mêlé Mohawks originaires de la Réserve Caughnawaga, sur les bord du fleuve Saint-Laurent, au Québec. On les appelle en général les Caughnawagas. Autrefois on les appelait les Mohawks chrétiens ou les Mohawks qui prient. Ils sont trois mille, dont au moins six cent cinquante passent plus de temps dans les villes des États-Unis un peu partout que dans leur réserve. Certains sont aussi remuants que des gitans. Il n’est pas inhabituel de voir une famille verrouiller sa maison, laisser la clé chez un voisin, monter en voiture et partir pour des années. Il existe des colonies de Caughnawagas à Brooklyn, Buffalo et Detroit. La plus grande colonie est à Brooklyn, dans le quartier de North Gowanus. Elle s’y est établie à la fin des années vingt, comprend environ quatre cents hommes, femmes et enfants, continue de grandir...

  • New York
  • reportage
  • New journalism
Marking the passage from misfortune to good luck
Marking the passage from misfortune to good luck

Elisabeth Bronfen

The Elevator—A Heteropia

An even more strikingly risky moment, which for Don anticipates both a personal and a professional crisis, occurs at the open door of an elevator in the fifth season. After Megan has confessed to him that she wants to stop working at the agency so as to fully concentrate on her acting career, he accompanies her to the elevator, where he takes leave of her by demonstratively giving her a passionate kiss before the door closes. Then, as though this... OPEN
ACCESS
  • architecture
  • Labor
  • everyday life
  • America
  • 1960s
Discourse

Ethical Ambivalence

I do not have much to say about why there is a return to ethics, if there is one, in recent years, except to say that I have for the most part resisted this return, and that what I have to offer is something like a map of this resistance and its partial overcoming which I hope will be useful for more than biographical purposes. I’ve worried that the return to ethics has constituted an escape from politics, and I’ve also worried that it has meant a certain heightening of moralism and this has made me cry out, as Nietzsche cried out about Hegel, “Bad air! Bad air!” I suppose that looking for a space in which to breathe is not the highest ethical aspiration, but it is there, etymologically embedded in aspiration itself, and does seem to constitute something of a precondition for any viable, that is, livable, ethical...

  • activism
  • community
  • politics
  • art
  • contemporary art
The world is all that is the case
The world is all that is the case

Françoise Armengaud, Annabelle Buxton

Wittgenstein’s Rhinoceros

The two young men meet up at the Cambridge railroad station. While waiting for the train, they browse the shelves of the station bookshop. All of a sudden, Wittgenstein grabs Pinsent’s arm: “Look at the title of this book!” “What a coincidence!” exclaims Pinsent, “It is perfect for you!” Both start to laugh. They purchase the novel of a famous English detective novelist entitled A Rhinoceros in the Library. Wittgenstein is very excited. “David, listen carefully,” he says to Pinsent. “I already have three things...
  • Wittgenstein
  • young readers
  • logics
  • thinking
Humanities

Can we be too fragile for real contact?

Kerstin Stakemeier: I would love to start by taking up what Claire was saying about the figure of the intruder and about intrusion and asking how you, Okwui and Sarah would respond to that, how you would reflect it back on to both of your contributions.

 

Okwui Enwezor: I think the encapsulation of this discussion in terms of the relationship between the intruder and hospitality is so perfect and apt because it is only in that context that the question of an unsettling disturbance arises. I think that intrusion has a force to it – a force that also provokes recognition and I think it is in that space of recognition that the debates about fragility can really happen. And I am very grateful that you brought this up, Claire. Of course, in my text there is a longer passage about Derrida, about hospitality, which relates precisely to this. I want...

Humanities

Movement, Interval, Plasticity

If sensory perception of the world takes place prior to all consciousness, one might ask, finally, what this “prior to consciousness” means – is it an unconscious or rather a non-conscious? Who is dancing when dancers dance? Who is moving when bodies process stimuli? For Freud, the notion of the drive was a transitional concept bridging the divide between the somatic and the mental. I think that today, for various reasons, it is possible to replace the notion of the drive with that of affect to obtain a similarly transitional concept. But as I explain in my theory of the affective dispositif, this concept is one that no longer follows the movement of desire (for the Other) but which, with a focus on movement, interval, and plasticity, leads to surprising parallels (synchronizations) between the socio-political and the somatic. In this context, the “not-yet-movement” of affect often mentioned here can be understood...

  • affects
  • gender
  • media theory
  • body
  • epistemology

 

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