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In 62 Episodes until Death
  • pop culture
  • violence
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  • film experience
  • USA
  • contemporary culture
  • aesthetics of film
  • Evil
  • television
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News + Events

Exhibition: On Series, Scenes and Sequences – FEATURE Yves Netzhammer

16.08.2017 – 03.09.2017

ETH Zürich Graphische Sammlung
Rämistrasse 101
8092 Zürich
Schweiz

Art and the Politics of Collectivity – Saas-Fee Summer Institute of Art III

03.07.2017 – 28.07.2017

Spike Art Quarterly
Rosa-Luxemburg-Strasse 45
10178 Berlin
Deutschland

Anthropocene Lecture: Bruno Latour

29.09.2017, 19:00

Haus der Kulturen der Welt
John-Foster-Dulles-Allee 10
10557 Berlin
Deutschland

Yves Netzhammer: Book Presentation and Artist’s Talk

22.08.2017, 18:30

ETH Zürich Graphische Sammlung
Rämistrasse 101
8092 Zürich
Schweiz

THE MOST BEAUTIFUL CLOUD NAMES

Dorothee Scheiffarth, 24.03.2017

Cumulus tuba ;
Cirrus cumulonimbogenitus ;
Wallcloud ;
Bannerwolke ;
Föhnfische ;
mother-of-pearl cloud ;
Altocumulus translucidus ;
Stratocumulus...

TWELVE DRUMMERS DRUMMING

Hanno Leichtmann, 24.03.2017

1. Ringo Starr
2. Mike D.
3. Roland TR 808
4. Jaki Liebezeit
5. Paul Lovens
6. Anthony Williams

ABT. DIE DUEMMSTEN BERLINER FRISÖRNAMEN

Blixa Bargeld, 24.03.2017

Liebhaarber
Schnittstelle
Schnittweise
Haareszeit Friseur
Pierette res capillorum Haarschneiderei
über Kurz oder Lang
Salon Stilkamm
Wasser und Welle
Ja-hairgroup...

Columns
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Other Topics
New releases
Reiner Schürmann: Luther. The Origin of Modern Self-Consciousness
Ulrike Bergermann (ed.), Monika Dommann (ed.), ...: Connect and Divide
Christian Marazzi: Le socialisme du capital
Claus Pias: Computer Game Worlds
Kerstin Stakemeier (ed.), Susanne Witzgall (ed.): The Present of the Future
Inke Arns (ed.), Sylvia Sasse (ed.), ...: Nikolaj Evreinov: »The Storming of the Winter Palace«
Fragility is the only thing I really know about me
Fragility is the only thing I really know about me

Claire Denis

“Fragility is the only thing I really know about me”

I am not a very balanced person. I am fragile and sad – almost as described in Triste Tropiques by Claude Lévi-Strauss. I feel both those adjectives, I grew up with them. I was aware of my fragility even when I was very young – a baby, learning to walk, living somewhere in Africa and already feeling that the number of white persons was very small compared to the number of black persons and also noticing that most of the... ABO
  • film d'auteur
  • autofiction
  • identity
  • subjectivity
Fiction

Tom McCarthy

I’m not really sure what is and what isn’t theory.

Elisabeth Bronfen

Tom, our idea here was that you would give us a little insight into how you find your themes, how you use theory for your texts.

 

T.MC.

I’m not really sure what is and what isn’t theory. I don’t really know where theory stops and fiction begins. If you take someone like, for example, Derrida: half of The Post Card is basically an epistolary novel; it’s fiction, there are characters, there is a character speaking to another character—even while he’s conducting a “theoretical” analysis of Heidegger. I think it’s very hard to pin down that border-line between it being theory/fiction or not theory/fiction. So theory wouldn’t just be a reflection on something else which is somehow more integral; it’s more fluid than that.

A figure like Lévi-Strauss is just wonderful in this respect: Tristes Tropiques is one of the most brilliant books and it’s much better as literature than almost all of...

  • literary studies
  • fiction
  • conversation
  • Modernism
  • literature
Fiction
Why this past? Why is this past mine? A past which I did not even know?


Reiner Schürmann

Why this past? Why is this past mine? A past which I did not even know?


  • youth
  • post-war generation
  • autobiography
  • post-war period
  • primal scene
  • past
  • migration
  • childhood
  • homosexuality
  • trauma
  • identity
  • 1968
  • National Socialism
  • memory
  • emigration
Lawless: Clouds Reprise
Lawless: Clouds Reprise

Ute Holl

The Moses Complex

The Moses complex derives its actuality from recalling the emergence of cultures as fields of mutually engendering relationships. From the perspective of media studies, which is a science of differential relationships between materialities and immaterialities, noises and messages, channels and signals, apparatuses and perceptions, the relationship to God or gods turns out to be one between people and their systems of thought. So media studies argues against fundamentalism, whether ontological, anthropological, or technicistic. The figure of Moses is a decisive node...
  • Jean-Marie Straub
  • community
  • Danièle Huillet
  • exile
  • Arnold Schönberg
Discourse

Elisabeth Bronfen

Marking the passage from misfortune to good luck

An even more strikingly risky moment, which for Don anticipates both a personal and a professional crisis, occurs at the open door of an elevator in the fifth season. After Megan has confessed to him that she wants to stop working at the agency so as to fully concentrate on her acting career, he accompanies her to the elevator, where he takes leave of her by demonstratively giving her a passionate kiss before the door closes. Then, as though this were an afterthought, he once more presses the button. Although, almost immediately, the doors of the elevator next to the one that Megan just stepped into begin to open, he suspects that something is wrong. Standing on the threshold of the opening, he finds himself looking down into the dark abyss of the empty elevator shaft. More astonished than alarmed, he steps back. Then the doors close again. The concrete...

  • everyday life
  • 1960s
  • architecture
  • Labor
  • America
Discourse

Artur Żmijewski

»… it’s rather that my perception of the world is unbearable for others…«

Film is a space of freedom – you can behave cynically, or even cruelly, and the viewers will think it’s ›just acting‹ anyway, so you have an alibi.
 Reality is a bit like we describe it. Our bodies are also like we describe them. Disease is pathophysiology’s narrative about the body. Old age is the narrative about the body told by the social security system. Bodies happen to be as society wants them. If it’s a nationalised body, for instance, one called up into the army, the narrative will be potentially tragic and lofty at the same time. […]

Compassion is a concept invented for the purpose of the onlookers – it’s their alibi. I look because I sympathise, not because I’m fascinated by physical deformity – such as the sight of a legless man. And yet it’s also a roadshow of forms, a theatre of strange visual combinations, of unexpected...

  • violence
  • artist
  • conversation
  • contemporary art
  • body
On the distribution of bodies in space
On the distribution of bodies in space

Stefan Hölscher (ed.), Gerald Siegmund (ed.)

Dance, Politics & Co-Immunity

The past years have seen a re-emergence of the need to think about and conceptualise the arts in general and dance in particular in terms of the political. Developments in globalised neo-liberal capitalism and the changes it has produced in the social fabric seem to beg for a statement of some kind from the artistic field. What is more, these changes increasingly affect the production and reception of dance itself, thereby laying bare the ideological underpinnings of its claim for...
  • performativity
  • globalization
  • body
  • community
  • politics
Humanities

Kati Kroß

»… Consistently Abused and Forced…«

When non-disabled artists such as Jérôme Bel or Christoph Schlingensief in their productions work with actors who, in hegemonic discourse, are referred to as disabled, they almost invariably face criticism over the exploitation and voyeuristic exhibition of these people. Bel’s Disabled Theater anticipated such reservations and took a good deal of wind out of its critics’ sails by having the performers themselves raise these issues on stage and report on their families’ reactions to the piece. Nevertheless, the question whether Jérôme Bel was showing up his actors was an inevitable topic in newspapers and on critics’ panels—even though, in view of the overall press reviews and the relatively small number of hatchet jobs, it seemed as if some critics only used these objections as alibis for legitimizing their respective point of view, their voyeuristic curiosity, or the work of the successful artist Jérôme Bel. The majority of reactions acquitted Bel...

  • disability studies
  • aesthetics
  • performing arts
  • identity
  • Jérôme Bel

 

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